Akira Yoshino

2019 Nobel Prize in Chemistry Laureate

Speaker Fee Range: Please inquire for fees

Travels From: Japan

Akira Yoshino is available for virtual keynotes and webinars. Please complete the form or contact one of our agents to inquire about the fees for virtual engagements. Please note: the fee range listed above is for in-person engagements.

Nobel Prize Speaker Akira Yoshino
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    Akira Yoshino

    2019 Nobel Prize in Chemistry Laureate

    Speaker Fee Range: Please inquire for fees

    Travels From: Japan

    Akira Yoshino is available for virtual keynotes and webinars. Please complete the form or contact one of our agents to inquire about the fees for virtual engagements. Please note: the fee range listed above is for in-person engagements.

    BOOK Akira Yoshino AS A SPEAKER

    Akira Yoshino earned a Nobel Prize for his work toward making lithium-ion batteries a commercial mainstay. He continues to refine his original design and to explore the use of rechargeable batteries in transportation and other sectors. Events devoted to green technology and scientific progress turn to Yoshino for insightful and authoritative keynote addresses.

    Akira Yoshino Speaker Biography

    Whenever you use a lithium-ion battery, you owe a little debt of thanks to its inventor, science speaker Akira Yoshino. As a keynote speaker, Akira Yoshino shares the secrets of the technologies he hopes will one day displace fossil fuels.

    After earning his BA and MA in petrochemistry from Kyoto University, Akira Yoshino went to work for Asahi Chemical Corporation. Among Asahi’s business customers were several Japanese electronics companies, which needed lightweight, rechargeable batteries to power their devices.

    Yoshino studied the problem, and adapted an earlier lithium-ion design by American John Goodenough. Replacing Goodenough’s metallic lithium anode with one made from petroleum coke, Yoshino’s design proved more stable and longer-lasting. Yoshino’s discovery was patented in 1985, and Sony released the first commercial lithium-ion battery in 1991.

    Only in 2005 did Yoshino receive his doctorate in engineering, from Osaka University. Five years later, he was named president of the Lithium Ion Battery Technology and Evaluation Center. At LIBTEC, Yoshino builds upon his previous work, developing solid-state designs for use in electric vehicles. He has also taught at Meijo University and Kyushu University.

    Yoshino won the Charles Stark Draper Prize in 2014, a portent of things to come. In 2019, he and also Stanley Whittingham shared the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their development of lithium-ion battery technology.

    Lithium-ion batteries show great promise as green energy sources for a wide range of applications.