Dan Ariely

World-Leading Authority on Consumer Behavior. Author, "Predictably Irrational". Behavioral Economist & Popular TED speaker

Speaker Fee Range: $50,000 - $100,000 USD

Travels From: USA

Dan Ariely is available for virtual keynotes and webinars. Please complete the form or contact one of our agents to inquire about the fees for virtual engagements. Please note: the fee range listed above is for in-person engagements.

Consumer Behavior Speaker Dan Ariely
REQUEST AVAILABILITY

Want to book Dan Ariely for your event? Please provide the info below and we’ll get in touch within 24h:

    Dan Ariely

    World-Leading Authority on Consumer Behavior. Author, "Predictably Irrational". Behavioral Economist & Popular TED speaker

    Speaker Fee Range: $50,000 - $100,000 USD

    Travels From: USA

    Dan Ariely is available for virtual keynotes and webinars. Please complete the form or contact one of our agents to inquire about the fees for virtual engagements. Please note: the fee range listed above is for in-person engagements.

    Dan Ariely Speaker Biography

    Behavioral Economist, best-selling author and popular keynote speaker Dan Ariely, featured by Fortune as “one of the 10 new gurus you should know”, is today’s most popular voice on consumer behavior.
    Dan Ariely studies how people actually act in the marketplace, as opposed to how they should or would perform if they were completely rational. His interests span a wide range of daily behaviors such as buying (or not), saving (or not), ordering food in restaurants, pain management, procrastination, dishonesty, and decision making under different emotional states.
    The James B. Duke Professor of Behavioral Economics at Duke University, Ariely’s research has shown that we all succumb to irrationality in situations where rational thought is expected. He is an expert on how people actually act (and why they act) in all kinds of business and economic environments, and what this means for business innovation, strategy, marketing and pricing.
    Dan is also author of the best-selling Predictably Irrational. In this book, he presents research findings that provide new insights into human behavior that will help us make better decisions. His experiments are consistently amusing and informative, demonstrating ideas that fly in the face of common wisdom. His latest best-seller is Amazing Decisions (Hill and Wang, 2019), which is a playful graphic novel guide to better decision-making.
    Dan publishes widely in the leading scholarly journals in economics, psychology, and business. His work has been featured in The New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, Boston Globe, Business 2.0, Scientific American, Science, CNN, NPR, and ABC’s 20/20.
    Dan Ariely holds a BA in Psychology from Tel Aviv University, a Ph.D in Cognitive Psychology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and a Ph.D in Marketing from Duke University. As a keynote speaker, Dan Ariely has a natural and unique talent for turning his research into vignettes that are fun, relevant and engaging, and for delivering the results in a genuinely charming, original, and often comical way.

    View full bio View summary bio

    Dan Ariely Keynote Topics

    Behavioral economics seeks to understand that emotional, social and cognitive trends affect us when making economic decisions, whether it is the choice of a product for its price or the allocation we make of our resources, among others. People act against their best interests much of the time – and it’s not because your company didn’t produce a good product or communicate the right information, but because other factors and motivations are at play, says Dan Ariely. Understanding what those are and how they influence decisions is critical to changing customer behavior. In this presentation, Ariely talks about human irrationalities, and how their challenges (and benefits) play out day-to-day in both the workplace and in our personal lives, affecting the product choices we make and how much we are willing to pay, among many other things. He explains how to apply the principles of behavioral economics to modify current offerings and redesign experiences to enable customers to make the right choices. Making good decisions is hard, Ariely stresses. Understanding the hidden forces that shape our decisions helps make it easier for them to decide to do what you want them to.

    Societies with higher trust perform much better. Research proves that those without trust have lower performance and GDP. The same is true for companies and relationships. One of the most interesting aspects of human behavior, says Dan Ariely, is the capacity to think of ourselves as honest even when we act dishonestly. In this engaging talk, he explains what trust in the digital age looks like, how valuable it is as a social good, how easily it can be broken and what we can do to build it up and keep it. He addresses how the principles of behavioral economics can help us understand and overcome some of the irrational tendencies behind dishonest behavior. The implications of this research are far reaching and include a better understanding of financial crises, regulations, the potential pitfalls that we should all worry about and day-to-day misbehaviors.

    There’s no question that understanding human motivation is important to anyone who runs a team or a company. Yet, the forces that motivate people are not always clear and easy to understand. In this talk, Dan Ariely vividly describes some experiments that uncover what motivates us in the workplace and in our personal lives. These experiments show that what we often think of as motivators do not always motivate us. And what we think does not matter sometimes ends up being very important. By the end of this talk, attendees will be armed with a new framework for modifying their current approach to be better at motivating those around us.

    One of the challenges we face when we try to improve our health is that what is good for us right now is often not what is good for us in the long term. Dieting, for example, is not so much fun now, but good for the future; the same can be said for medical tests, procrastination and even saving money. When we face such tradeoffs, we often focus on the short term rather than our long-term goals, and in the process get ourselves into trouble. But there is hope. In this talk, Dan Ariely describes multiple experiments that help us understand where and why we fall short, and more importantly, how health care leaders can use this knowledge to develop methods that will ultimately help us overcome our natural (and less than desirable) inclinations when it comes to our decisions.

    Dan Ariely Speaking Videos

    Dan Ariely - Predictably Irrational - basic human motivations
    Dan Ariely - How equal do we want the world to be? You'd be surprised