Kurt Wüthrich

2002 Nobel Prize in Chemistry Laureate

Speaker Fee Range: $20,000 - $50,000 USD

Travels From: Shanghai, China

Kurt Wüthrich is available for virtual keynotes and webinars. Please complete the form or contact one of our agents to inquire about the fees for virtual engagements. Please note: the fee range listed above is for in-person engagements.

Nobel Prize Speaker Kurt Wuthrich
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    Kurt Wüthrich

    2002 Nobel Prize in Chemistry Laureate

    Speaker Fee Range: $20,000 - $50,000 USD

    Travels From: Shanghai, China

    Kurt Wüthrich is available for virtual keynotes and webinars. Please complete the form or contact one of our agents to inquire about the fees for virtual engagements. Please note: the fee range listed above is for in-person engagements.

    BOOK Kurt Wüthrich AS A SPEAKER

    Kurt Wüthrich won a Nobel prize for his pioneering efforts to describe the molecular structure that produces life itself. His groundbreaking techniques have allowed us to perceive and manipulate proteins in ways previously unimagined. Events that celebrate the trailblazing spirit of science turn to Wüthrich for inspiring keynote addresses.

    Kurt Wüthrich Speaker Biography

    Nobel Prize speaker Kurt Wüthrich has reinvented the way we perceive the building blocks of life. A uniquely insightful keynote speaker, Kurt Wüthrich illuminates the quest to understand the fundamental structures of life on earth.

    Kurt Wüthrich is the 2002 Nobel laureate in Chemistry. He is best known for developing nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods for examining the structure of biological macromolecules.

    A native of Switzerland, Wüthrich studied at the University of Bern before earning his PhD in chemistry from the University of Basel. His PhD thesis introduced him to resonance spectroscopy, and his post-doctorate work led him even further into that field.

    At the University of California-Berkeley, Wüthrich studied metal complexes using then-new nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy techniques. At Bell Laboratories, Wüthrich oversaw one of the first superconducting NMR spectrometers, which he used to study proteins.

    Returning to Switzerland, Wüthrich developed the first two-dimensional NMR experiments alongside Nobel laureate Richard R. Ernst. His work applied the nuclear Overhauser effect to measure distances within proteins, providing a newly precise understanding of their structure. This, in turn, led to a much better understanding of proteins used to treat pancreatic disorders, among other applications.

    Wüthrich received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his development of NMR methods to determine protein structures. He is also Cecil H. and Ida M. Green Professor of Structural Biology at Scripps Research and Distinguished Professor at Shanghai Tech University.

    Kurt Wüthrich Keynote Topics

    The 2002 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, Kurt Wüthrich, talks about the importance of science education and chemistry for the future of humanity and how he spent all his life in the pursuit of scientific breakthroughs.

    In biological / biomedical research, as well as in medical diagnosis, the physical principle of nuclear magnetic resonance has found widespread applications. On the one hand, these include obtaining images of macroscopic objects, such as the inside of the human body, and on the other hand, many applications focus on the structure and dynamics of biological macromolecules. Such uses of NMR in structural biology have contributed in many cases to the basic knowledge that allows the rational design of new medications or improvements of medications that are already in clinical use.

    Kurt Wüthrich Speaking Videos

    Kurt Wüthrich - A life-long pursuit of scientific breakthroughs
    Kurt Wüthrich - Physics Principle of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance in the Life Sciences