Paul Romer

2018 Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences

Speaker Fee Range: Please inquire for fees

Travels From: New York, USA

Paul Romer is available for virtual keynotes and webinars. Please complete the form or contact one of our agents to inquire about the fees for virtual engagements. Please note: the fee range listed above is for in-person engagements.

Economy Speaker Paul Romer
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    Paul Romer

    2018 Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences

    Speaker Fee Range: Please inquire for fees

    Travels From: New York, USA

    Paul Romer is available for virtual keynotes and webinars. Please complete the form or contact one of our agents to inquire about the fees for virtual engagements. Please note: the fee range listed above is for in-person engagements.

    Paul Romer Speaker Biography

    Paul Romer, economist and policy entrepreneur is a co-recipient of the 2018 Nobel Prize in Economics Sciences and University Professor in Economics at NYU. He has spent his career at the intersection of economics, innovation, technology, and urbanization, working to understand and accelerate human progress.

    Paul received the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences for his work “integrating technological innovations into long-run macroeconomic analysis,” which integrated ideas and innovation into economic models for the first time, making clear the societal benefits possible when people join together and collaborate in new ways.

    Paul previously served as the Chief Economist at the World Bank. He is the Founding Director of NYU’s Marron Institute of Urban Management, which works to help cities plan for their futures and improve the health, safety, and mobility of their citizens, as well as the founder of the Charter Cities initiative, which introduced a framework designed to help traditionally disenfranchised populations share in the benefits of rapid urbanization.

    Paul has made numerous contributions to public policy, including writing an opinion for the United States Justice Department on the Microsoft Antitrust ruling, serving on Singapore’s Independent Academic Advisory Panel on university policy, and consulting for a host of other governments and legislators on policy initiatives tied to education, urbanization, science, technology, and innovation.

    Prior to coming to NYU, Paul taught at Stanford University’s Graduate School of Business and in the Economics departments of the University of California, Berkeley, the University of Chicago, and the University of Rochester. While teaching at Stanford, Paul founded Aplia, an education technology company dedicated to increasing student effort and classroom engagement. To date, students have submitted more than 2.4 billion answers to homework problems on the Aplia website. Aplia was sold to Cengage Learning in 2007.

    He is currently a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research, a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and a non-resident scholar at Macdonald-Laurier Institute in Ottawa, Ontario. In 2002, he received the Recktenwald Prize for his work on the role of ideas in sustainable economic growth.

    Paul earned a B.S. in mathematics from the University of Chicago and a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Chicago after completing graduate work at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Queens University. In addition to scholarly journals, his writing has appeared in the Wall Street Journal, the Financial Times, and the Harvard Business Review, and is a regular speaker at events ranging from TED and Aspen Ideas Festival to editorial boards and industry conferences worldwide.

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    Paul Romer Keynote Topics

    Why is populism rising? Why are we facing a new era of trade friction? How is the erosion of integrity impacting politics? How can countries cooperate in the face of intense nationalism? How can governments improve the lives of their citizens despite these challenges? The speech will weave together Paul’s work as an economist, including the work on technological innovation that earned him his Nobel Prize, to address the most important macro trends and challenges facing globally minded leaders today, and provide a compelling and sobering, yet optimistic case for why the best is yet to come and how the trends that have enabled the current challenges can be harnessed to create future opportunities.

    In an era of rising division, mistrust, and rhetoric, this speech will rise above politics to offer an economist’s macro perspective on what the US can and should do to compete with other nations, recognizing that the most successful outcomes can be beneficial for all parties. The speech will focus on opportunities for growth and innovation across the country. Paul will address how updating our thinking on competition can unlock new progress in everything from innovation and business to economic development and education, how redefining our nation’s relationship to its innovators and scientists is critical to solving big problems, and how we can leverage the things we can all agree on to continue the grand experiment that is America, no matter the challenges posed from outside or within.

    Why this century is a once in a species opportunity and why cities are the key to progress.


    Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis once said that states are the laboratories of democracy. In this speech, Paul will lay out the case for why cities are the laboratories of progress in an era of rapid urbanization. Paul will focus on how cities can and attract new residents, how city scale real estate development can redefine what’s possible for the future of humanity, and what we can do now to unlock untold progress in the future in the hundreds of soon to be mega cities rapidly growing now. The speech will address key areas of progress cities are uniquely poised to unlock, timely issues like migration, technological innovation, and identity.

    How both Domestic and International Markets along with monetary policy shape the Economy


    The temporary recessions of the global economy seem to be inevitable, but unlimited growth is possible in a world with finite resources. In this compelling presentation, Nobel Prize Recipient, Paul Romer, shares the current state of the global economy, what has led us to the status quo, and how both the United States and the rest of world can select a path of economic growth long into the future.

    China and the United States will share the world’s stage for generations to come. China’s path to progress and growth in the 20th century was a remarkable turnaround and the current era’s trade frictions are a sign of deeper misunderstandings in this relationship. In this speech, Paul Romer will share a clear eyed understanding of the innovations that enabled China’s return to global prominence, and how these two superpowers can shape their interactions and share insights into the ways this competition can be structured to benefit everyone involved.

    Paul Romer Speaking Videos

    Paul Romer - Nobel Laureate in Economic Sciences 2018 Lecture
    Paul Romer at TED - Charter Cities