Mikko Hypponen

Chief Research Officer at F-Secure. Cybersecurity & Privacy Expert

Speaker Fee Range: $5,000 - $20,000 USD

Travels From: Finland

Mikko Hypponen is available for virtual keynotes and webinars. Please complete the form or contact one of our agents to inquire about the fees for virtual engagements. Please note: the fee range listed above is for in-person engagements.

Cybersecurity Speaker Mikko Hypponen
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    Mikko Hypponen

    Chief Research Officer at F-Secure. Cybersecurity & Privacy Expert

    Speaker Fee Range: $5,000 - $20,000 USD

    Travels From: Finland

    Mikko Hypponen is available for virtual keynotes and webinars. Please complete the form or contact one of our agents to inquire about the fees for virtual engagements. Please note: the fee range listed above is for in-person engagements.

    BOOK Mikko Hypponen AS A SPEAKER

    One of the best cybersecurity experts and the first to inform the public about the Sasser outbreak. Speaker Mikko Hypponen’s cybercrime investigations have made him one of the 50 most influential individuals on the internet. Organizations book Mikko Hypponen to understand how to defend the internet from viruses, what forms of online attacks exist, and everything else related to cybersecurity.

    Mikko Hypponen Speaker Biography

    Cybersecurity speaker Mikko Hypponen is a renowned cybersecurity specialist with two decades of experience in private briefings, keynotes, and public speaking.

    Mikko has been with the antivirus company F-Secure since 1991. He serves as the company’s Chief Research Officer, and he has guided his staff through some of the most significant computer virus attacks in recent history. Mikko’s team succeeded in taking down the network utilized by the Sobig. F worm.

    Furthermore, he was the first to inform the public about the Sasser outbreak. He has also given confidential briefings on the Stuxnet worm operation. Stuxnet is a malicious worm meant to disrupt the Iranian nuclear program.

    Mikko has spent more than 25 years investigating cybercrime. He has also served as an advisor to the European Union’s police agency, EUROPOL.

    The New York Times, Wired, and Scientific American have all published articles about Hypponen’s work.

    Throughout his professional career, he has obtained numerous awards. He has been named one of the world’s most important individuals on the internet by PC World magazine. Mikko also appeared on the FP Global 100 Thinkers list.

    In 2010, he received the Virus Bulletin Award, which recognizes the top trainer in the computer virus field. The following are some of the events he has talked at: TEDGlobal, DLD, Forum de Haute Horlogerie, and EDIST.

    Google Zeitgeist, SXSW, CeBIT, and MWC have all hired Mikko Hypponen as a speaker. He has also delivered speeches on privacy issues to the European Parliament. Furthermore, Mikko has spoken at the Universities of Oxford, Stanford, and Cambridge.

    In 2011, Mikko Hypponen gave a TED talk on “Fighting Viruses, Defending the Net” which went viral. The video boasts 2 million views.

    In his TED talk, Mikko discusses how viruses have changed since the first one appeared in 1986. He shows how we can keep viruses from becoming a threat to the internet so that criminals cannot use them as espionage tools.

    Mikko Hypponen Keynote Topics

    We've lived our lives in the middle of a revolution: the internet revolution. During our lifetime, all computers started talking to each other over the internet. Technology around us is changing faster than ever. We've already become dependent of our digital devices, and this is just the beginning. As connected devices open new opportunities for imagination, they also open new opportunities for online criminals. Where are we today? Where are we going? And how are we ever going to secure ten billion new devices that will be going online over the next decade?

    Computer security has gone through several distinct eras. Attacks morph and change every few years. However, the biggest changes we've seen have not been technical; they've been social. It's all about the attackers and their motives. To survive, companies need to understand the risks they face. What are the criminal attackers doing today? What about the hacktivists? And why do we see more and more malware written by governments? Do terrorist groups have credible online attack capability? And what can you do to protect your network?

    Data is money. The world of finance is now changing faster than ever, due to the digital revolution. Cryptocurrencies and blockchains bring us benefits but also huge problems in the shape of money laundering, online crime and rampant energy use. What's happening next? Where are we going?

    Technology shapes our conflicts and crisis. Technology shapes the wars we fight. Cyber has become the 5th domain in which we fight our wars: land war, sea war, air war, space war - and now, cyberspace war. Today, all nations build cyber defences but also offensive cyber technology. We are in the beginning of the next arms race.

    Our societies run on computers and software. How does a power plant in Japan trust the logic controllers they bought from a Germany, the routers they bought from China, the workstations they bought from USA and the security system they bought from Russia? It all boils down to trust. Trust. That’s a complicated concept in the internet age. Without trust, we won’t have safety. Without safety, we won’t have security. And without security, we won’t have anything at all.

    Technology shapes the world. The more successful a new technology becomes, the more reliant we will become of it. This has always happened and will happen in the future too. In many ways, internet is the best and worst innovation done during our lifetime. We were all given a free and open internet, but what kind of an internet will we be leaving behind? Our global networks are being threatened by surveillance and crime. How did we get here? And where will we go next?

    Business cyber security landscape has changed fast because of COVID-19. Organizations face new kinds of challenges due to uncertainty, the remote workforce and the surge of opportunistic cybercriminals.

    In this webinar Mikko Hypponen will cover the latest developments on cyber attacks around the pandemic.

    Mikko Hypponen Speaking Videos

    Mikko Hypponen - Securing The Future
    Mikko Hypponen - The Internet is on fire